Mr. Beeman expressed a desire to see more blogs from my end of the group, but this is something I have been thinking of writing about for a while now.

Living in the jungle means you are literally never alone. After the other interns are gone, the kids are in bed, Maria has tucked in for the night, and Julio has made his rounds about the residence, I usually sit in the kitchen for a spell until the mosquitos become too much to bear and I have to get behind a locked door before my blood is sucked out of me.

When it’s not a mosquito taking a sip of me, its usually an ant taking a bite. There are several categories of ants, named and classified by me in no scientific manner:

-Sugar Ants- will always be on the sugar jar and in the coffee cup, basically the color of sugar and harmless to touch or ingest.

-Black Biters- little ball ants that live on every other surface where you stand or sit, and will twist as they bite. You can brush them off with your hand, but the bite lasts a few days.

-Red Hot Angry Ants- These ants are visible as you cross their path, and in the event you get one in your shoe, it will bite through the sole of your foot. These are nasty to touch in any way.

-Ninja Ants- only once have I seen these huge black ants that seem intent on destroying other living creatures. They seem to run straight for you with no interest in their own well-being.

 

While most of Costa Rican animals have been cool to look at and find, insects are best left away and far from us. Some are loud, some buzz right by your ears, and some crawl up legs faster than you can jump and tell the others to get it!

But there are no chiggers like in Texas, or grasshoppers that get as fat as a dime. At least not here where we are.

Sometimes at night in the kitchen with the bare light bulb, a cool moth will come to the light and flutter around for a moment, with wings as big as the palm of my hand. These are the moments where the jungle leaves me in awe of the life if produces, so big and yet so fragile.

However, I will be glad to say goodbye to some of these bugs when I leave. With 3 weeks left, I hope we have fewer encounters between now and then.

 

Pura vida and quit buggin’ around,

Maricella Garcia

martygarcia@schreiner.edu

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